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fan studies

[QUOTE] From Anne Jamison from the “Future of Fanworks” chat with fan studies authors, going on right now. Join in!

(about fandom visibility) In the last couple of years, I see many more people willing to be open about their activities and let them connect their fannish identities with RL identities. I also see Lori’s point about transcultural fandom, although I see that blending is much more apparent in visual work than in fanfiction (though these are increasingly linked—another change).

[QUOTE] From Paul Booth from the “Future of Fanworks” chat with fan studies authors, going on right now. Join in!

I think the biggest change I’ve seen to fandom is its incredible visibility in recent years. As digital technology increases the availability of fandom (and the texts that fans are fans of), it has become more common to be seen as a fan — perhaps not completely de-stigmatized, but more recognized by the industry and by everyday people. I’m not sure if the geeks shall inherent the earth yet — but it’s getting close

[META] Storify by Bertha Chin: tweets and pictures of the Fan Studies Network Symposium 2013

Storify by Bertha Chin: tweets and pictures of the Fan Studies Network Symposium 2013:

[LINK] Storify by Bertha Chin: tweets and pictures of the Fan Studies Network Symposium 2013

storify.com/bertha_c/fan-studies-network-symposium-2013-2014?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=email&utm_medium=email

Tweets from the Fan Studies Network Symposium, hosted by the School of Political, Social and International Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, on Saturday 30th November 2013. Featuring a keynote by Professor Matt Hills, and over 30 papers from international delegates.

[LINK] Going on right now: Fan Studies Network 2013 Symposium

fanstudies.wordpress.com/fan-studies-network-symposium-2013/

The Fan Studies Network Symposium is taking place in Norwich right now and being live-tweeted at #FSN2013. Check out the program:

09:30 – 10:20: KEYNOTE
Professor Matt Hills (Aberystwyth University) (Chairs: Lucy Bennett & Tom Phillips)
10:30 – 10:45: BREAK
10:45 – 12:00: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel A: Spaces and Performance (Chair: Tom Phillips)
Panel B: Celebrity (Chair: Sarah Ralph)
12:00 – 13:00: LUNCH
13:00 – 14:30: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel C: Gender (Chair: Bertha Chin)
Panel D: Classic Fandoms, New Narratives (Chair: Ruth Deller)
14:30 – 14:45: BREAK
14:45 – 16:00: SPEED GEEKING (Chair: Richard McCulloch)
16:00 – 16:15: BREAK
16:15 – 17:45: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel E: Transculture (Chair: Nele Noppe)
Panel F: Textualities (Chair: Bethan Jones)
17:45 – 18:00: CLOSE – Lucy Bennett & Tom Phillips (Fan Studies Network)

More info and abstracts

Going on right now: Fan Studies Network 2013 Symposium

The Fan Studies Network Symposium is taking place in Norwich right now and being live-tweeted at #FSN2013. Check out the program:

09:30 – 10:20: KEYNOTE
Professor Matt Hills (Aberystwyth University) (Chairs: Lucy Bennett & Tom Phillips)
10:30 – 10:45: BREAK
10:45 – 12:00: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel A: Spaces and Performance (Chair: Tom Phillips)
Panel B: Celebrity (Chair: Sarah Ralph)
12:00 – 13:00: LUNCH
13:00 – 14:30: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel C: Gender (Chair: Bertha Chin)
Panel D: Classic Fandoms, New Narratives (Chair: Ruth Deller)
14:30 – 14:45: BREAK
14:45 – 16:00: SPEED GEEKING (Chair: Richard McCulloch)
16:00 – 16:15: BREAK
16:15 – 17:45: PARALLEL PANELS
Panel E: Transculture (Chair: Nele Noppe)
Panel F: Textualities (Chair: Bethan Jones)
17:45 – 18:00: CLOSE  - Lucy Bennett & Tom Phillips (Fan Studies Network)

More info and abstracts

[LINK] Fan/dom: People, practices, and networks | Transformative Works and Cultures

journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/532/408

katiedidn-t:

A focus on fandom from multiple perspectives is critical, given ongoing challenges in conceptualizing what it is to be a fan. How do we attempt to process a concept that is simultaneously claimed as an activity, an identity, and a connection to others? Rather than seeing this confusion as a problem, perhaps it is more useful to see it as precisely the point. In trying to understand an aspect of media culture that we all, to some degree, engage in, the field of fan studies needs to approach fans and fandom in a variety of ways: at the level of the individual, at the level of practices, and as a framework in which the self encounters media culture. In our current moment, the media environment is undergoing dramatic changes. It is critical that fan studies continues to question the control of cultural production and consider the ways that today’s media industries are working to accommodate both fans and fan practices.

[ read more ]

Totally forgot to post this back when it was published in TWC. Oops!

[REQUEST] Academic works on uses of fanworks in education

Rebecca Tushnet is looking for academic works that talk about the uses of transformative works in education, for instance how various kinds of fanworks are used in classrooms, what skills and knowledge people learn from making/consuming fanworks, and so on. She’s especially interested in what the most well-known and authoritative sources on fanworks in education are, but any sources would be very welcome.

Suggestions? Thanks in advance!

Crosspost: fanhackers.tumblr.com/post/63041136528

[QUOTE] From Emily Regan Willis, Fannish discourse communities and the construction of gender in “The X-Files”

Much of the literature on fan fiction sees slash fiction as transformative because of its imposition of a queer framework on heteronormative texts. While I do not disagree that this is one way fan fiction can be transformative, it is a mistake to believe that slash is inherently more transformative than het or gen fic just because of its queering of canon.

Issue 14 of Transformative Works and Cultures is out!

Congratulations to the editors and writers! Links to all articles below. As usual, we’ll be posting some good quotes from these in the coming days, and you’re very welcome to submit your own.

Editorial

Spreadable fandom - TWC Editor

Theory

Metaphors we read by: People, process, and fan fiction - Juli J. Parrish

Sub*culture: Exploring the dynamics of a networked public - Simon Lindgren

Praxis

A Japanese media pilgrimage to a Tasmanian bakery - Craig Norris

Trans-cult-ural fandom: Desire, technology and the transformation of fan subjectivities in the Japanese female fandom of Hong Kong stars - Lori Hitchcock Morimoto

Fannish discourse communities and the construction of gender in “The X-Files” - Emily Regan Wills

Capital, dialogue, and community engagement: “My Little Pony—Friendship Is Magic” understood as an alternate reality game - Kevin Veale

Symposium

So bad it’s good: The “kuso” aesthetic in “Troll 2” - Whitney Phillips

Translation, interpretation, fan fiction: A continuum of meaning production - Shannon K. Farley

Fan/dom: People, practices, and networks - Katherine E. Morrissey

Fandom, public, commons - Mel Stanfill

Review

“Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture,” by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green - Melissa A. Click

“Reclaiming fair use,” by Patricia Aufderheide and Peter Jaszi - Josh Johnson

“Genre, reception, and adaption in the ‘Twilight’ series,” edited by Anne Morey- Amanda Georgeanne Retartha

[META] completelysane: On a slightly related note – this! The Fan Phenomena series by Intellect Books is out – or at least some of them. They take an academic approach to fandom but are designed to be accessible to the average reader, and discuss fandom, cosplay, new media, and pop culture. I helped work on these – very briefly. Other titles not pictured (because I gave the postcards to comic shops) are Batman and Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Twin Peaks and Buffy are out now, with the others coming soon. You can order them from Intellect, the University of Chicago, or Amazon.

completelysane: On a slightly related note – this! The Fan Phenomena series by Intellect Books is out – or at least some of them. They take an academic approach to fandom but are designed to be accessible to the average reader, and discuss fandom, cosplay, new media, and pop culture. I helped work on these – very briefly. Other titles not pictured (because I gave the postcards to comic shops) are Batman and Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Twin Peaks and Buffy are out now, with the others coming soon. You can order them from Intellect, the University of Chicago, or Amazon.

[LINK] Destination: Toast!: Conversations about fandom: on non-canonical ships and judging fans.

destinationtoast.tumblr.com/post/55679106603/conversations-about-fandom-on-non-canonical-ships-and

acafanmom:

destinationtoast:

51pegasi-b and I had an interesting email thread about societal judgement of different kinds of fans, and also canonical vs. non-canonical ships. I wanted to post excerpts and expand a little.

51:

I think [fandom is] something only some people choose to be “out” about. I feel as…

This is a long, interesting discussion; I’m truncating just because destinationtoast had asked about acafandom resources, and I wanted to share a few of my fandom studies favorites:

Confessions of an Aca-Fan – this is Henry Jenkins’s blog, and Jenkins is basically the father of fan studies. Check out also his seminal book (a newly revised version), Textual Poachers, to see where it all began. More recently, he’s co-edited Spreadable Media, which I am clearly going to have to read myself.

Founded by Kristina Busse and Karen Hellekson, the bi-annual journal Transformative Works and Cultures is the academic arm of the Organization for Transformative Works, which also houses our own AO3. There is a LOT of really excellent writing on fandom here, covering a range of topics, and it’s dedicated to its Open Access policy. They put out a special topics issue (most recently, comic book fandom) and a general issue every year.

Another excellent journal is Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, headed by Sue Turnbull and Martin Barker. While this journal is more broadly focused on audience studies (which can include fandom studies, but also encompasses other aspects of filmgoing/TV viewing). Also Open Access!

A really exciting, newer blog is Suzanne Scott’s Revenge of the Fans – I’m still getting up to speed on her work, but the blog is accessible and really interesting.

Sadly, scholar Matt Hills doesn’t keep an academic blog, but his work continues to have a strong influence within the field. Online, he’s most active on the Doctor Who News website, where he writes reviews of newly-aired episodes (if you read anything of his, you’ll quickly figure out the extent of his Love of DW). He also has an essay that I really liked in the book Sherlock and Transmedia Fandom, edited by Kristina Busse and Louisa Ellen Stein (who blogs at transmedia | new media, tv, fandom).

A more recent book that’s been generating a lot of buzz in the fandom studies community is Lynn Zubernis and Katherine Larsen’s Fandom at the Crossroads, which looks at fandom (and, in particular, fan pleasure) through the lens of their own Supernatural fandom. They have an active blog at Fangasm!, and I think another book in the works.

Finally, the University of Iowa Press is currently putting together a series of fan studies-related books – something to keep an eye out for, as some terrific scholar-fans are said to be contributing.

These are just some resources off the top of my head – happy reading! :)

ETA: I forgot to pimp my own blog. I contribute at On/Off Screen which, while not solely focused on fandom studies, has a strong fan studies component. Regular contributors are Inger-Lise Kalviknes Bore, Rebecca Williams, Bertha Chin, and me. We’re still pretty young and so it’s not an extensive blog, but the posts are – IMHO – great. We also occasionally feature guest posts. :)

ETA2: ALSO, the Fan Studies Network has a nice list of fan studies journals that’s more comprehensive than what I have up above.

[QUOTE] From Patrick Galbraith and Thomas Lamarre, Otakuology: a Dialogue, p362

Scholars working on Japanese popular culture are only distinguished by the quantity of their publications and the novelty of their topics, which conditions a preference for niche subjects, which are analyzed by applying simplified superstructures. The result is a tendency toward exoticizing and essentializing. This tendency often reflects or even reproduces sensationalist journalism about Japan. This is very clear in the context of otaku. Definitions are set up on the basis of “otaku” in Japan, but often with little or no contact with these imagined others, and there is a critical lack of engagement with experts in Japan. Thus discussions of otaku repeat assumptions about unique, even bizarre habits and practices. And such assumptions go unquestioned, because Japanese uniqueness is the last remaining rationale for continued study of Japan itself. Japan appears as the quintessential “non-Western” example.

Patrick Galbraith and Thomas Lamarre, Otakuology: a Dialogue, p362

[REQUEST] Transformative Works and Cultures wants reviewers!

Transformative Works and Cultures, the OTW’s scholarly fan studies journal, is looking to expand its pool of volunteer reviewers. If you are interested in peer reviewing for TWC, please come over to the site, sign up, and create a profile as Reviewer: journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/user/register. You’ll be asked to fill out some information (such as uni affiliation if applicable), but, most importantly, there’s a field in the software where you input your interests and expertise. 

Once you’ve created a reviewer account, please e-mail us to tell us who you are, how you found us, and what you are specifically interested in. We use the journal’s database to find reviewers, but it is often easier when we have spoken to reviewers already and know a bit about them. Then we’ll contact you when a manuscript comes in that fits your expertise, and ask if you can review it.

If you have any questions about reviewing; if you want to know more about submitting essays, Symposium pieces, or book reviews; or if you there’s something specific you want to know about TWC, please feel free to contact us. For more info on what TWC does, check out the recent interview with the editors on the OTW blog.

The Journal Team

editor@transformativeworks.org

Crosspost: fanhackers.tumblr.com/post/56457445212