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[LINK] April Membership Drive: Spotlight on Transformative Works and Cultures

The OTW blog shines a spotlight on the academic fan studies journal TWC. Excerpt:

What gets you excited about academic studies in fandom?

“Here’s what I’m excited about,” said Karen Hellekson in 2008: “an academic journal that welcomes, instead of rejects or overtly mocks, fan studies as a topic … that takes as a given the notion that fans provide something valuable to our culture that ought to be analyzed.”

That journal is Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC): run, peer-reviewed, edited, and supported by OTW members and fans like you.

TWC is a journal with contributions from fan studies scholars all over the world. Edited by Hellekson and Kristina Busse, TWC has produced 15 issues so far, featuring fascinating contributions in topics ranging fromfanvids to fan labor to Supernatural.

Here’s another reason to get excited: TWC is completely free to the public, and has been from the beginning. Academic journals are traditionally locked to people with university affiliations. Often you have to pay US$30 to $45 for access to a single article. But ours is an online-only Open Access Gold journal: free for the readers at the point of access. Plus, our Creative Commons copyright lets anyone reprint the essays for free. These are essential principles behind TWC, enabling its goal of connecting academics and fans through community and accessibility. That’s why the journal also has an open space for non-academic fans to chime in, through the Symposium section in every issue.

Read more

[LINK] Fanworks Inc. directory of pro writers’ policies on fan fiction

www.fanworks.org/writersresource/?tool=fanpolicy

A large directory of pro writers’ policies on fan fiction, including mostly authors who write in English. The directory links to direct quotes or other sources that indicate the authors’ opinions on fan fiction about their works. The directory is somewhat outdated but still a very interesting resource, especially since it seems to include some authors who aren’t mentioned on Fanlore’s Professional Author Fanfic Policies page yet.

The owner of the Fanworks Inc. site has indicated in May this year that they may take the whole site down, so best grab the information on here soon if you need it.

[LINK] CfP European Fandoms and Fan Studies Conference

European Fandom and Fan Studies: Localization and Translation One Day Symposium, 9 November 2013 Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis and University of Amsterdam Department of Media Studies Call for Papers The increasingly global circulation of media often threatens to obscure local contexts of reception, identification, interpretation, and translation. This one day symposium at the University of Amsterdam seeks to explore the state of Fan Studies and the variety of Fandoms focused within the social and geographical boundaries of Europe, particularly with regard to processes of localization and translation, broadly interpreted. Inter-disciplinary papers are invited to explore the nature of the field itself, how different fandoms function within Europe, and how European fan cultures re-interpret, re-imagine, translate, and localize foreign media texts or foreign fan practices. Potential avenues of exploration may include how Fan Studies is represented, studied, and received within European universities, by funding bodies and publishers. Papers on fandoms may explore how European (English and non-English speaking) fans of European and non-European objects of fan appreciation participate in fandom, the differences between internet fandoms and local/national/international fan practices, and objects of fan appreciation that originate within Europe. Topics of interest include but are not limited to: -Regional fan histories. -Negotiation between international and local fan infrastructures. -Local and national adaptation of fan cultures and identities. -European fans’ impact on international public policy and industry practice. -Fans’ relationships to national media industries and public policy. -National and transnational economies within fandom and/or fan studies. -Crossing national, cultural, and language boundaries in fandom and fan studies. -Translation, both linguistic and cultural. -Fans’ local and international languages and economies of desire. -Framing local European fan objects and cultures within fan studies. -Processes of translation, adaptation, and localization in European fans’ interaction with global media. The symposium is associated with a special issue of the journal of Transformative Works and Cultures tentatively slated for 2015, with full papers due January 1, 2014. Event Details The symposium will be held in the center of Amsterdam, easily accessible from Amsterdam international airport. Submission Process Please send a 300 word abstract along with a short (100 word) biographical note to Anne Kustritz (A.M.Kustritz@uva.nl<mailto:A.M.Kustritz@uva.nl>) or Emma England (E.E.England@uva.nl<mailto:E.E.England@uva.nl>) by 10 September.

[LINK] The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction

www.sf-encyclopedia.com/

The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction is currently in its third edition and encompasses over 4 million words about all things SF. It is published online in collaboration with Gollancz and the SF Gateway.

This new version follows thirty-five years of work (on and off), and is heavily expanded from previous editions. The first being under the GeneralEditorship of Peter Nicholls in 1979; and the 1993 Second Edition, being edited by John Clute (the most prolific contributor to date) and Peter Nicholls. The third edition is based on the 1995 CD-Rom “printing” and it has David Langford as the primary technical editor as well as a contributor.

As a resource for fan studies, the encyclopedia is useful because it includes a whole section titled “Culture” including separate categories/tags for “Publication”, “Fan”, “Award”, and “International”. It is by no means comprehensive but it does offer information not always found elsewhere, especially regarding SF fanzines and Big Name Fans (of literature especially).

[LINK] New fan-themed issue of the journal Participations

The tenth issue of Participations, an online open access journal for audience studies, has a section full of new articles about fan culture. The section was put together by the Fan Studies Network, a network for fan studies researchers.

I haven’t had time to read any of the articles yet, but it sounds like there’s some very interesting stuff in here about many fandoms and fan practices – from Doctor Who, Glee, and Star Wars to Tumblr, kink memes, fandom and politics, and dojinshi. Here’s a list of all the fan-themed articles in the issue (all links go to PDFs):

Bennett, Lucy & Tom Phillips: ‘An introduction: The Fan Studies Network – new connections, new research’

Booth, Paul & Peter Kelly: ‘The changing faces of Doctor Who fandom: New fans, new technologies, old practices?’

Busse, Kristina: ‘Geek hierarchies, boundary policing, and the gendering of the good fan’

Chin, Bertha & Lori Hitchcock Morimoto: ‘Towards a theory of transcultural fandom’

Ellison, Hannah: ‘Submissives, Nekos and Futanaris: a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the Glee Kink Meme’

Hills, Matt: ‘Fiske’s ‘textual productivity’ and digital fandom: Web 2.0 democratization versus fan distinction?’

Lamerichs, Nicolle: ‘The cultural dynamic of doujinshi and cosplay: Local anime fandom in Japan, USA and Europe’

Pett, Emma: ‘”Hey! Hey! I’ve seen this one, I’ve seen this one. It’s a classic!”: Nostalgia, repeat viewing and cult performance in Back to the Future

Proctor, William: ‘”Holy crap, more Star Wars! More Star Wars? What if they’re crap?”: Disney, Lucasfilm and Star Wars online fandom in the 21st century’

Sandvoss, Cornel: ‘Toward an understanding of political enthusiasm as media fandom: Blogging, fan productivity and affect in American politics’

Whiteman, Natasha, Joanne Metivier: ‘From post-object to “Zombie” fandoms: The “deaths” of online fan communities and what they say about us’

Bury, Rhiannon, Ruth Deller, Adam Greenwood & Bethan Jones: ‘From Usenet to Tumblr: The changing role of social media’

McCulloch, Richard, Virginia Crisp, Jon Hickman & Stephanie Jones: ‘Of proprietors and poachers: Fandom as negotiated brand ownership’

Freund, Kathrina & Dianna Fielding: ‘Research ethics in fan studies’

Jones, Bethan & Lucy Bennett: ‘Blurring boundaries, crossing divides: An interview with Will Brooker’

Delmar, Javier Lozano & Victor Hernández-Santaolalla & Marina Ramos: ‘Fandom generated content: An approach to the concept of ‘fanadvertising”

Sturm, Damion & Andrew McKinney: ‘Affective hyper-consumption and immaterial labors of love: Theorizing sport fandom in the age of new media’

 

[LINK] Timeline of Fandom and Profit

Inspired by the discussion around Amazon’s announcement of Kindle Worlds, here’s a preliminary timeline on Fanlore of notable happenings related to fandom and profit. Famous instances of commercialization of fanworks, of exchange of money in fandom, profit-related incidents between fans or between fans and professionals, and so on.

Any examples to add? Please edit the wiki page or drop the info here so I can edit it in. There’s a great deal still missing, especially about commercialization of fanworks besides fic (fan films, mods, fan translations etc), and I have vague memories of reading about many more profit-related incidents in academic works and elsewhere.

[LINK] List of journals that publish academic research on fans

fanstudies.wordpress.com/fan-studies-journals/

If you’re looking for a place to read academic research on fans, or a place to publish your own research, check out this list of journals compiled by the Fan Studies Network. The list is handily divided into open access journals (journals that can be read for free online by anyone) and non-open access journals (journals that can generally be read only via a university library, or by paying for access).

The list is updated regularly. If you have any recommendations for journals that should be added here, for instance non-English language journals, mail Lucy Bennett at bennettlucyk@gmail.com.

[LINK] Science Fiction Fandom History

Two particularly useful websites for the study of the history of science fiction fandom are Fancyclopedia III and its sponsor site, Fanac.

Both websites are primarily concerned with the history of long-term “traditional” science fiction fandom, such as that associated with Worldcon.

In their own words, “The Fanac, The Fan History Project” is:

devoted to the preservation and distribution of information about science fiction and science fiction fandom. Here you might find your favorite fanzine, pictures of Walt Willis in Ireland or Harlan Ellison at the 1955 Worldcon. You can also find the words to an early filk song, information about an SF con near you AND all sorts of strange and wonderful information about fandom’s past. And the present, too, because that’s tomorrow’s past.

Fancyclopedia begins with:

Science fiction fandom began in the 1930s, when readers of the pulp magazines began to write to each other. While fandom can be a very loose association, its members identify with fandom and with each other, and know many other fans.

Fancyclopedia 3 is a collective enterprise of all of fandom. Based on the previous works by Jack Speer (Fancyclopedia 1), Dick Eney (Fancyclopedia 2), and Rich Brown, it is written by fans who want to contribute.

It continues with:

Like most encyclopedias, Fancyclopedia contains articles on people, events and organizations. It has a Fanzines category. It contains a glossary of fanspeak which is referenced by any articles using fannish terms…

And:

Articles should be relevant to science fiction fandom as such. While comix fandom, animé, and the Society for Creative Anachronism (as examples) arose from science fiction fandom, they are now largely independent. Articles on other fandoms should note their relationships with science fiction fandom and provide links to sites concerned with those fandoms.

Both resources offer a wealth of information to researchers of science fiction and fandom. They are particularly good at providing essential background information on the development of the diversity of contemporary fandoms.

[LINK] Inside Scanlation – Inside the world of scanlation

www.insidescanlation.com/

Very extensive fan-made resource on scanlation and its history, chock full of great info. Includes a timeline of scanlation, in-depth articles on important online hubs and scanlation groups, background info on the ins and out of scanlation and various related issues, and more. TWC did an extensive review of the site and the info on it in 2010.

Fanlore’s scanlation article is a good and quick intro to the topic, by the way. For some longer reads on scanlation, here’s a list of academic articles that are definitely worth checking out as well. (Link goes to the work-in-progress bibliography of fan studies work that TWC and Fanhackers are working on. More on that one later. If you need access to any of the articles that are behind a paywall, try requesting a copy on Fanhackers.)

[LINK] Signal boost: WebCite online citation service needs help

fundrazr.com/campaigns/aQMp7

WebCite is a user directed citation tool that allows you to create a static single page snapshot for your online citations. The service is non-profit and has been operational for 10 years, and it’s been used by hundreds of journalists, writers, historians, bloggers and researchers, in personal, professional and academic capacities. Wikipedia relies on WebCite to prevent “link rot”, and fans have used WebCite on (for instance) Fanlore while documenting fannish history. The service can’t access private, locked or password protected content, and it honors “no indexing” commands. In this, it works much like the Internet Archive/WayBack Machine. Unlike with the Internet Archive, though, you can direct WebCite to a specific page at once instead of hoping that one day the Internet Archive will find and crawl the site.

More info about WebCite here: www.webcitation.org/ and www.webcitation.org/faq

WebCite needs to raise development funds, or they’ll have to stop offering citation services at the end of 2013. Their fundraising page is here: fundrazr.com/campaigns/aQMp7

[LINK] A thesis on the AO3′s tagging system

transformativeworks linked to a study of AO3 tagging and said:

A thesis written about the AO3’s tagging system “attempts to begin exploring the question of what kind of environment the site’s particular blend of open social tagging and some behind-the-scenes vocabulary control, plus hierarchical linking, creates for the users who search through it for fiction.” The study, conducted in 2012, had a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods and the survey was completed by 116 people. “The current online information glut calls for some sort of subject labeling to facilitate efficiency in searching, but the volume of information is well beyond a size that could ever be dealt with by information professionals. “Social tagging” is an approach to this problem that lets non-professionals attempt to organize online information via tagging, for their own and one another’s use. But social tagging is a new and rapidly evolving field, and so no consensus has yet been reached on its overall usefulness, or on what best practices might be.”

I have no time at all to read this right now – any interesting findings or ideas in there?

[LINK] Professional Author Fanfic Policies – Fanlore

fanlore.org/wiki/Professional_Author_Fanfic_Policies

This page is such interesting reading, especially the patterns that emerge when authors talk about the reasons why they changed their minds about fic, why they allow it but don’t read it, and so on. Several authors (Ellen Kushner, Poppy Z. Brite) mention that they once believed fic endangered their copyright in their works, but have since learned that that fear is false. Others, like Orson Scott Card and Jennifer Roberson, still seem to be clinging to it to some degree. Many more authors (Sarah Rees Brennan, N.K. Jemisin, Marjorie M. Liu, Diana Peterfreund, Kaja & Phil Foglio, Katherine Kurtz) mention that they don’t read fic for legal reasons, Many others mention that they read and write fic, or sometimes even comment on it.

Most of the sources cited for the authors’ comments seem to be fairly recent. It’s interesting to see that even today, there’s so much variety in how pro authors understand the relation between fanworks and copyright law. You’d expect that there would be at least some sort of professional consensus by now, but it seems like echoes of the confusion caused by the Marion Zimmer Bradley Contraband incident are still around.

[LINK] As Others See Us: Fanfic in the Media

as-others-see-us.dreamwidth.org/

Very large linkspams to all sorts of mentions of fanfic in the media, posted weekly. Includes quotes from the pertinent bits. Beautifully formatted, and especially great for getting an instant overview of what people are saying when something fandom-related happens that’s remarkable enough for non-fannish media to pick up on it.

For instance, I was surprised to see that throughout the initial Fifty Shades of Grey uproar, many media outlets were being quite reasonable and even positive about fic. Often awkward and rarely 100% correct, and often a bit sensationalist. But the ones that got it completely backwards or dissolved into “think of the children” angsting seemed to be a blessedly small minority.

In any case, highly recommended resource.

[LINK] Discussion of Fanhackers’ “no quoting fannish meta without permission” policy and about fanwork permissions in general

elf.dreamwidth.org/673250.html

Thoughtful critique of our “no quoting fannish meta without permission” policy, and discussion in the comments about how to make it easier for fans to indicate that what sort of re-use of their work they’re okay with (or not).