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[LINK] April Membership Drive: Spotlight on Transformative Works and Cultures

The OTW blog shines a spotlight on the academic fan studies journal TWC. Excerpt:

What gets you excited about academic studies in fandom?

“Here’s what I’m excited about,” said Karen Hellekson in 2008: “an academic journal that welcomes, instead of rejects or overtly mocks, fan studies as a topic … that takes as a given the notion that fans provide something valuable to our culture that ought to be analyzed.”

That journal is Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC): run, peer-reviewed, edited, and supported by OTW members and fans like you.

TWC is a journal with contributions from fan studies scholars all over the world. Edited by Hellekson and Kristina Busse, TWC has produced 15 issues so far, featuring fascinating contributions in topics ranging fromfanvids to fan labor to Supernatural.

Here’s another reason to get excited: TWC is completely free to the public, and has been from the beginning. Academic journals are traditionally locked to people with university affiliations. Often you have to pay US$30 to $45 for access to a single article. But ours is an online-only Open Access Gold journal: free for the readers at the point of access. Plus, our Creative Commons copyright lets anyone reprint the essays for free. These are essential principles behind TWC, enabling its goal of connecting academics and fans through community and accessibility. That’s why the journal also has an open space for non-academic fans to chime in, through the Symposium section in every issue.

Read more

[LINK] Signal boost: WebCite online citation service needs help

fundrazr.com/campaigns/aQMp7

WebCite is a user directed citation tool that allows you to create a static single page snapshot for your online citations. The service is non-profit and has been operational for 10 years, and it’s been used by hundreds of journalists, writers, historians, bloggers and researchers, in personal, professional and academic capacities. Wikipedia relies on WebCite to prevent “link rot”, and fans have used WebCite on (for instance) Fanlore while documenting fannish history. The service can’t access private, locked or password protected content, and it honors “no indexing” commands. In this, it works much like the Internet Archive/WayBack Machine. Unlike with the Internet Archive, though, you can direct WebCite to a specific page at once instead of hoping that one day the Internet Archive will find and crawl the site.

More info about WebCite here: www.webcitation.org/ and www.webcitation.org/faq

WebCite needs to raise development funds, or they’ll have to stop offering citation services at the end of 2013. Their fundraising page is here: fundrazr.com/campaigns/aQMp7