Currently, the structure of fansubbing distribution is highly decentralized and  difficult  to  coordinate.  In  peer-to-peer  file  sharing,  there  are  no  central organizations  but  rather  multiple  –  very  transient  –  global  networks  among individual file sharers. With such a structure, it

Freedom is a slippery concept, especially when it comes to digital media. When we think about questions of copyright and digital ownership through cultural theft, freedom from domination lines up with freedom from having to pay—at least on the surface.

The rise of the Internet also meant that Comike lost its monopoly as the center of otaku and dōjinshi culture. Nevertheless, Comike remained the most important event for Japanese fans, especially after companies with otaku-related products started to exploit it.

It requires a certain cultural expertise and freedom to be able to arrange cultural fragments skilfully to new ends. This is reflected in The LEGO Movie, where the most prestigious characters are so-called masterbuilders, people who have the actual ideas

The Internet has fueled a massive amount of creativity, from the silly to the profound. Information scientist and copyright advocate Casey Fiesler talks about her experiences as a remixer, including how her feminist remix of a Barbie book went viral

Justice Scalia’s uncredited borrowing from a party’s legal brief escapes condemnation because the social context of his copying makes him a jurist, not a plagiarist. Similarly, fan creations, even without disclaimers, usually announce their unauthorized status so clearly through context

The newer fans’ language is perhaps less measured (and certainly more concise) than that of early Sherlockians, but it carries the same fundamental sentiment: that, regardless of the legal merits (or lack thereof) of their claims, those asserting legal objections