The separation between fandom as a subcultural social practice and the mainstreaming of fan culture wherein “fannish values and reading practices spread across the entire viewing public” in ways supported by media corporations is noteworthy (Jenkins 2006). In the mainstreaming

The Internet has fueled a massive amount of creativity, from the silly to the profound. Information scientist and copyright advocate Casey Fiesler talks about her experiences as a remixer, including how her feminist remix of a Barbie book went viral

Justice Scalia’s uncredited borrowing from a party’s legal brief escapes condemnation because the social context of his copying makes him a jurist, not a plagiarist. Similarly, fan creations, even without disclaimers, usually announce their unauthorized status so clearly through context

Nice basic overview of some big fanfic-and-copyright discussions that have taken place over the years, from 50 Shades to Marion Zimmer Bradley to Kindle Worlds. For more in-depth analysis of legal issues surrounding fanworks, check out some of the many,

Perhaps most notably, by offering works that arguably “push the envelope” more than the works of the formal manga industry, dōjinshi may produce examples of innovation that create new opportunities for the entire industry. Indeed, mainstream manga publishing companies have